DigitSmith

Going into embroidering

Like Tree1Likes

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old October 9th, 2012, 12:02 PM   #1 (permalink)
teamsports teamsports is offline
Junior Member
Join Date:
Oct 2012
Posts:
3
Liked:
0 times
Default Going into embroidering

Sorry for the newbie questions but we are a team dealer that has been outsourcing all of our embroidering work to two local guys. The problem we have been running into for the last year is they canít/ wonít turn the order around fast enough. We spend between $40k and $50k a year for embroidering. Iím thinking about buying a machine and doing it all in house. My questions are training, is there somewhere that has on hands classroom training? Or are there any embroiders in the southeast that would take and train someone for several weeks? This is my main concern, as I have no idea how to run a machine and will have to hire/train someone to run it.
What type of machine, Iím thinking at least a 4 head and maybe a 6 head. Our normal order are around 20-35 pieces but can get up to 140-150 on larger orders. Brands? Will 4 heads be enough or should I go 6? Any good sites that sell used equipment.

What are the profit margins that most of you work with? I donít expect to make a lot of money just break even and the ability to turn around with our machine will generate more business for us.

Thanks!!
Send a private message to teamsports ContactReply & Quote
Old October 9th, 2012, 12:41 PM   #2 (permalink)
BJ24 BJ24 is offline
Member
Join Date:
Sep 2012
Location:
Seattle
Posts:
88
Liked:
3 times
Default Re: Going into embroidering

I would say the most popular brands out there are Tajima and Barudan. With that being said....I have been in the business digitizing since 1995 and worked on many different types of machines and a machine is a machine. If you can learn one you can learn another. They are basically all similar. Now, when you buy the machine try to get training in the package deal from whoever you buy the machines from. Most people will throw in some training on the machines...just like anything there is a learning curve but if you are willing to put in the time it is worth it in the end. I started out at a digitizing company then moved to a production company that ran 24 hours and then started my own digitizing business so I have seen all aspects of the embroidery process.
Once you own the machine, make sure you understand the technical side of it-what I mean is the maintenance of it. What would hurt money wise is having to bring in a tech. to fix issues. They are very costly and usually not from your area so you have to pay for their travel, expenses and then an arm and leg on the repairs. So take good care of your machines and it will pay on itself. If you are having that much profit off of embroidery I don't see why you wouldn't take the chance and run it in house....
If you have any questions that I could possibly help you with just email me.
BJ
[email address]
Send a private message to BJ24 ContactReply & Quote
Old October 9th, 2012, 01:56 PM   #3 (permalink)
minimalist minimalist is offline
Senior Member

minimalist's Avatar
Join Date:
Mar 2011
Posts:
252
Liked:
56 times
Default Re: Going into embroidering

Take your 40K to 50K and divide by the number of items that were embroidered to give you a rough idea of rate of each piece. Now you get to add in labor, maintenance, supplies, software, training, and taxes. If you take the first figure and divide by 50% or so then you know basically what the margin is. If the second set of expenses is less than that then you get a strange concept known as profit.
Send a private message to minimalist ContactReply & Quote
Old October 9th, 2012, 01:57 PM   #4 (permalink)
minimalist minimalist is offline
Senior Member

minimalist's Avatar
Join Date:
Mar 2011
Posts:
252
Liked:
56 times
Default Re: Going into embroidering

Forgot to mention something. Running the machine is easy. Figuring out the software is more difficult.
Send a private message to minimalist ContactReply & Quote
Old October 9th, 2012, 03:23 PM   #5 (permalink)
nametags nametags is offline
Senior Member
Join Date:
Feb 2010
Posts:
211
Liked:
5 times
Default Re: Going into embroidering

Hope you're ready to pay someone a decent/good salary for running your machines. If not, you'll pay at the other end for repairs and bad embroidery. And how many people. I agree with minimalist above,,,do the math first.
Send a private message to nametags ContactReply & Quote
Old October 9th, 2012, 04:32 PM   #6 (permalink)
Robert Young Robert Young is offline
Senior Member

Robert Young's Avatar
Join Date:
Oct 2007
Location:
Harlingen, TX
Posts:
1,460
Liked:
180 times
Default Re: Going into embroidering

I agree with Nametags .. but first I would talk to the embroiderers you currently have and find out if they can give you faster services...especially if you feel that if you were faster you would get more business... that is their motivation to get back in your good graces...... if not then I would go one step more... I would steal an already trained operator from them . hey sorry, they already know your product and you said nothing about their quality so I am assuming they are good for you.
__________________
Modern Embroidery Designer
www.volant-tech.com
www.volantfineart.com
Send a private message to Robert Young ContactReply & Quote
Old October 9th, 2012, 05:27 PM   #7 (permalink)
teamsports teamsports is offline
Junior Member
Join Date:
Oct 2012
Posts:
3
Liked:
0 times
Default Re: Going into embroidering

Thanks for the help. Robert, we have talked with both guys about getting stuff faster and it doesnt seem to help (I agree I thought that would motivate them but it has not). Their quality is great! Nametag, this is my biggest worry about this, is getting someone that can run the machine/software (I dont have time) and I'm willing to pay someone a good salary.
Send a private message to teamsports ContactReply & Quote
Old October 9th, 2012, 07:05 PM   #8 (permalink)
BJ24 BJ24 is offline
Member
Join Date:
Sep 2012
Location:
Seattle
Posts:
88
Liked:
3 times
Default Re: Going into embroidering

Not sure I agree with paying machine operator too much. Where I used to work we ran 3 shifts with about 20 machine operators. They were all around minimum wage. The only person paid a higher amount in production was the floor manager and the quality control person.
Send a private message to BJ24 ContactReply & Quote
Old October 12th, 2012, 08:42 AM   #9 (permalink)
Robert Young Robert Young is offline
Senior Member

Robert Young's Avatar
Join Date:
Oct 2007
Location:
Harlingen, TX
Posts:
1,460
Liked:
180 times
Default Re: Going into embroidering

I agree that if you know what you are doing , and anyone with 20 machine operators is probably in that category... then you can pay market rate. BUT if you are just starting out and need an operator I would err to the side of caution and pay ABOVE market rate. You need an experienced operator.. one who has been around for years. One of the last things you need is to come in one day and find they have left you to work at a fast food place for more money. (to me paying minimum wage means you can lose them any time they get upset or some friend tells them about an opening somewhere else)

I would pay them enough that you KNOW they are not going anywhere... even when the pressure is on and you are being more demanding or asking them to go above and beyond to finish an order, etc.
minimalist likes this.
__________________
Modern Embroidery Designer
www.volant-tech.com
www.volantfineart.com
Send a private message to Robert Young ContactReply & Quote
Old October 12th, 2012, 12:09 PM   #10 (permalink)
minimalist minimalist is offline
Senior Member

minimalist's Avatar
Join Date:
Mar 2011
Posts:
252
Liked:
56 times
Default Re: Going into embroidering

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert Young View Post
I agree that if you know what you are doing , and anyone with 20 machine operators is probably in that category... then you can pay market rate. BUT if you are just starting out and need an operator I would err to the side of caution and pay ABOVE market rate. You need an experienced operator.. one who has been around for years. One of the last things you need is to come in one day and find they have left you to work at a fast food place for more money. (to me paying minimum wage means you can lose them any time they get upset or some friend tells them about an opening somewhere else)

I would pay them enough that you KNOW they are not going anywhere... even when the pressure is on and you are being more demanding or asking them to go above and beyond to finish an order, etc.
I'll add that the OP better learn everything about it as well. Otherwise when Robert's scenario occurs, you're dead in the water. I had this happen in my leather business. One sewing machine operator stopped showing up for work and a month later the other one walked out. I taught myself how to sew and reconstructed all the patterns they stole within a week. Luckily I had bought new JUKI TSC441's replacing the POS Union Locks.
Send a private message to minimalist ContactReply & Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Embroidering from China dd2 Embroidery and Digitizing 2 June 22nd, 2011 11:58 PM
FOR SALE Brother BES-1216AC one head Embroidering Machine concepts Help Wanted 6 June 22nd, 2011 08:48 AM
Brother BES-1216AC one head Embroidering Machine concepts Old Embroidery Ads 2 March 28th, 2011 08:27 PM
Question on Embroidering with Wooly Nylon dwgnldy Embroidery and Digitizing 0 February 18th, 2009 03:21 PM
Embroidering small items san0003 Embroidery and Digitizing 5 February 13th, 2006 09:29 AM

All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:44 PM.
Copyright © 2011 DigitSmith. All rights reserved.
Forums software by VBulletin, Copyright © 2000-2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.